Viking Town Name Generator & Short Stories

The walls of Beinholt were of no ordinary stone or wood construction. With each failed siege they grew taller, shored up with the bones of fallen enemies.

Generate Names

Angtoft

Selby

Ennestoft

Threlkirk

Hikkisun

Kirkjahús

Steinnhaugr

Skaggarðr

Epthveit

Haugrtoft

Langskirk

Haugrvik

Forge Your Own Name: Discover Our Name Suggestions & Backstories

Table of Contents

The Viking Age was a fascinating period of history in its own right, but the unique customs and attitudes of its clans make it ideal fodder for new fantasy landscapes. Choosing a name as mighty as the Vikings themselves is vital, whether you’re setting the scene for bloodthirsty battles, or exploring the intriguing worlds of Norse mythology.

Good Viking Town Names

Viking towns were often named with references to local geographical features, establishing their worth to a clan and aiding navigation. Inspiration for towns of your own creation can follow this example using words from the Old Norse language, allowing you to use as much creative license or historical authenticity as you like.

  • Skeggen        
  • Jellige        
  • Kegthveit        
  • Jorvik        
  • Threltoft        
  • Skellikirk        
  • Jorgustoft        

Dreyrugrakr

Dreyrugrakr is famous for raising the land’s mightiest warriors, who practice their craft with cruel and bloodthirsty precision.

  • Oskeld        
  • Beinholt        
  • Angtoft        
  • Jorgethorpe        
  • Elthveit        
  • Threlkirk        
  • Kelsby        
  • Ornkirk        
  • Laugebekka        

Búðvik

Sometimes the best place to settle is the first place you land. This philosophy has served the citizens of Búðvik well, as the coastal caves protect them from waves and raiders alike.

  • Kirkness        
  • Skegthveit        
  • Hofon        
  • Langthveit        
  • Kellithorpe        
  • Elvik        
  • Jorskeld        
  • Klifholm        
  • Skaptaholt        

Aepellundr

A charming town built around an abundant orchard. Each year, the apple harvest is celebrated with communal dances, and plentiful cups of mead.

  • Bekketoft        
  • Skagata        
  • Jagness        
  • Hekklevik        
  • Ennestoft        
  • Skaggahús        
  • Jendelbekke        
  • Garðrgata        
  • Jundthveit        
  • Skegtoft        

Mikillhús

Mikillhús is so-called for the majestic hall which sits atop its central hill. Its shadow across the lower dwellings ensures the ruler’s might will never be forgotten.

  • Jegby        
  • Haroldhús        
  • Threlness        
  • Gatahús        
  • Ullusthveit        
  • Apaltoft        
  • Holgata        
  • Skegness        
  • Langby        
  • Ullasund        

Fúllbekkr

The stinking bogs of Fúllbekkr are enough to deter any would-be raiders, but its citizens know that come Spring, it’s one of the few places around where the water runs clear.

  • Búðholm        
  • Mikkilklif        
  • Ellestoft        
  • Kestelbekke        
  • Kaldrholr        
  • Langrgata        
  • Koppisthorpe        
  • Hikkisun        

Breiðrþvait

After a particularly vicious battle led to the burning of all local resources, this town was renamed Breiðrþvait, reflecting the barren expanse that remained.

  • Eskiholm        
  • Threlby        
  • Sandhús        
  • Steinnhaugr        
  • Epthveit        
  • Kirkjasteinn        
  • Kaldrhús        
  • Eppletoft        

Djúprholr

A town for the fearful, Djúprholr is hidden deep within the cleft created by two mountains. The passage to its gates isn’t shown on even the most detailed local map.

  • Langskirk        
  • Ellegata        
  • Garðrdalr        
  • Indelsthorpe        
  • Haugrlund        
  • Búðness        

Digging into the rich history of the Viking era provides great inspiration for town names. Let me know in the comments which ones you liked best, or if you’ve come up with your own interesting combinations. Feel free to share with fellow raiders and sailors too!

Cassidy Ferrari
Cassidy Ferrari
D&D is a creative practice for me, in which I can explore everything from the surreal to the divine. I like to use names as a storytelling device, so every interaction helps players to build a stronger mental image of the world. I hope that my articles for Codex Nomina help you have more fun with fantasy names!

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